Iteration Value Questions

  1. Why is working iteratively important?
  2. Is it wise to make a complete plan for a project?
  3. What does working iterative protect us against?
  4. How fast should you take action and do something? What if your actions are not reversible easily?
  5. What do we mean by “cleanup over sign-off”?
  6. What is MVC?
  7. When is working iteratively hurtful?
  8. What is the goal of an iteration?
  9. What is not an iteration? give some examples that you think of yourself!
  10. If I do something without shipping to users - is it an iteration?
  11. If I do something without planning at all or thinking at all - is it a valid iteration?

1. Why is working iteratively important?
Iteration can save us from big mistakes that can be very costly and time consuming. If we take small but quick steps forward, we diminish the impact of mistakes and it’s easy to move backwards and improve.

2. Is it wise to make a complete plan for a project?
We can plan a project, but I would say most ideally plan its goal. The way we get there might vary, specially if we’re constantly iterating, but we might never get there if we don’t have a goal. I’d say plan for the long term and be able to adapt the short-term.

3. What does working iterative protect us against?
Making big and expensive mistakes. Creating something the client doesn’t need for example.

4. How fast should you take action and do something? What if your actions are not reversible easily?
We make fast decisions only when they’re easily reversible. If they’re not, we need to take a more thoughtful decision.

5. What do we mean by “cleanup over sign-off”?
If we always have to wait for approval, it might slow things down. It’s easier if we cleanup the mess if it goes wrong, without needing to wait for signoffs.

6. What is MVC?
MVC stands for minimal viable change. We try to follow these when iterating, which means always looking at the smallest possible change to make the most user impact possible.

7. When is working iteratively hurtful?
· When we need consistency
· When we’ve set development plans
· When team stability is involved
· When we’ve trained our teams
· When adjusting the values.

8. What is the goal of an iteration?
To get feedback from the end-user.

9. What is not an iteration? give some examples that you think of yourself!
Changing something without shipping it to users. If we don’t get feedback, it’s just a revision, not an iteration. For example, if we notice a bug and fix it in development, but never actually push it, it won’t make an impact until we do.

10. If I do something without shipping to users - is it an iteration?
Nope, just a revision.

11. If I do something without planning at all or thinking at all - is it a valid iteration?
I guess it would be, there doesn’t need to be a big plan, just an impact for users.

  1. makes us better
  2. yes
  3. against failure
  4. fast enough, look for help
  5. do not leave anything pending
  6. most valuable co-worker?
  7. burnout
  8. to be better
  9. when something could be automated, but it had not been automated
  10. no
  11. no, it depends
  1. Why is working iteractively important?
    Mistake are very expensive in the live of every company, but with iteration you are show that mistake are been taken care of, so as such it will save company from costly mistake.
  2. Is it wise to make a complete plan for a project?
    Planning a project is a good thing to do at the time and is goal of every business to plan a project. if you did not plan anything you want to do you have already plan you way to fail, so is a wise thing to do.
  3. What does working iterative protect us against?
    Working iteractively protect us as a company from a big mistake that can cost us much.
  4. How fast should you take action and do something? What if your actions are not reversible easily?
    making fast decision is good only if you can back to it for change if not we need to make a deep thought before taking decision.
  5. What do we mean by “cleanup over sign-off”?
    Waiting for approval can slow things down. We can prevent this with automation (testing, ability to roll-back). Instead of waiting for approval we ensure we can cleanup the mess in case something goes wrong. We always try to ensure people don’t need to wait for signoff.
  6. What is MVC?
    MVC mean Minimal Viable Change at all cost we try to iterate things no matter how small the change is.
  7. When is working iteratively hurtful?
    Is when consistency is key in all that we need to do.
    When there is well develop plan on ground.
    When there is a need for team stability
    Wen training our team is involves
    When values in need to be adjusted
  8. What is the goal of an iteration?
    Is to get quality feedback from the customer in every business
  9. What is not an iteration? give some examples that you think of yourself!
    Changing something without shipping it to users. If we don’t get feedback, it’s just a revision, not an iteration. For example, if we notice a bug and fix it in development, but never actually push it, it won’t make an impact until we do.
  10. If I do something without shipping to users - is it an iteration?
    Never, That is just revision
  11. If I do something without planning at all or thinking at all - is it a valid iteration?
    An excuse to avoid planning that all it is.
  1. Why is working iteratively important?

iterations helps to reduce BIG mistakes by getting feedback from end-user consistently.

  1. Is it wise to make a complete plan for a project?

no; only the first small step for the next iteration; it’s better to describe your action in 5 minutes that describe the whole plan in 2hours; project scope might change.
so small quick steps, focus on the first iteration, document it, commit to a date and don’t wait.

  1. What does working iterative protect us against?

Costly big mistakes!

  1. How fast should you take action and do something? What if your actions are not reversible easily?

all direct responsible indiivual can make decisions without approval mostly because we are looking for iterate with small changes, if an action is not easily reversible a through-discussion is needed.

  1. What do we mean by “cleanup over sign-off”?

don’t wait for approval (sign-off) it’s better to build small and then clean up if a mess was done. reversing changes is positive in small iterations.

  1. What is MVC?

minimal viable change: small quick steps moving forward.

  1. When is working iteratively hurtful?
  • adjusting marketing messages
  • adjusting product categories or prices :slight_smile:
  • adjusting sales methodologies
  • adjusting values or organizational changes.
  1. What is the goal of an iteration?

to get continuous feedback from end-user

  1. What is not an iteration? give some examples that you think of yourself!

changes are not available to end-users; and if end-users do not provide feedback.

  • example1: to be proactive in the task I added small change that is not requested or not in my scope of the iteration (strawman) or something that end-user might need to review or see.
  • example2: work on the small changes for the iteration but not documented the changes. that fails the purpose if reverting is needed.
  1. If I do something without shipping to users - is it an iteration?

no do something without shipping to users is NOT an iteration.

  1. If I do something without planning at all or thinking at all - is it a valid iteration?

even the small planning of a task requires some thought pursuing the customers’ need.

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  1. Why is working iteratively important?

It is important to work iteratively because publishing a project as simple and as soon as possible will make us work on it constantly, and therefore, it will continue to improve versus releasing something that we presume is “ready to launch and perfect” and then not working on improving it again. It’s also easier to fix a project as it goes because there’ll be simpler and easier fixes to work on instead of maybe building a big, complex project and then having to fix a lot more material and potentially more complex mistakes.

Sending smaller and simpler features to the users will also help us get useful feedback a lot sooner so that we can work on the necessary fixes just as efficiently as we get their feedback. This method can also help set the right expectations from everyone involved since we’re not working on a finished product, but simply developing adjustments and improvements every time, which in turn are easily reversible or changed.

  1. Is it wise to make a complete plan for a project?
    No. It is a lot better and more efficient to focus on the first step and what needs to be done for that, and then continue focusing on the next iteration every time.

  2. What does working iterative protect us against?
    Working iterative protects us from “costly, big mistakes” for the same things named under the first question. Taking small steps and going back to improve them every time can give us confidence in the final product, and will ensure everyone is satisfied with it, including and especially, the users because we are propelled by results from the very first step.

  3. How fast should you take action and do something? What if your actions are not reversible easily?
    We shouldn’t wait if we have something of value that we could implement straight away. DRIs, for example, are free to take any decision without awaiting approval but only as long as it’s reasonably reversible, but if not, then consultation is needed.

  4. What do we mean by “cleanup over sign-off”?
    Cleanup over sign-off means that since we have a bias for action, and since waiting for someone’s approval can waste time, taking action swiftly while making sure that we can “clean up the mess,” if necessary, trumps the need to wait for approval.

  5. What is MVC?
    Minimal Viable Change is everything that can add value and improve results for the project or product we are working on, although it should preferably be a small change. We are able to use our discernment, but when it comes to working on user projects, we should consult with them first while sharing the details of how our proposed MVCs will add value to their product.

  6. When is working iteratively hurtful?
    It can be hurtful to work iteratively if we are impulsive and don’t think things through or consider the guidelines above. When it comes to important items within the core of Moralis, there is an additional approval process to make sure the iteration doesn’t take away but adds value to that which we’re modifying.

  7. What is the goal of an iteration?
    The goal of an iteration is to get feedback from the end-user.

  8. What is not an iteration? give some examples that you think of yourself!
    Since the goal of an iteration is to get feedback from the end-user, then anything that doesn’t go through them isn’t an iteration. For example, setting up the first step, brainstorming by oneself or other team members about future iterations, and revising previous iterations.

  9. If I do something without shipping to users - is it an iteration?
    No, then it is simply a revision. We don’t call revisions iterations.

  10. If I do something without planning at all or thinking at all - is it a valid iteration?
    If it’s a creative thought that we had without much planning, and is an MVC and/or can go by the cleanup over sign-off principle, and we ship it to the user, then yes. But wanting to bombard users thoughtlessly with trivial changes that don’t add value just for the sake of sending something then it is not a valid iteration, it can get in the way of results and also damage the relationship with the user.

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1. Why is working iteratively important?

  • Allows us to show customers what we are doing and collect feedback quickly and potentially adjust our course

2. Is it wise to make a complete plan for a project?

  • Don’t write large plans, only write the first step. Trust that you’ll know better how to proceed after something is released

3. What does working iterative protect us against?

  • If we take smaller steps and ship smaller, simpler features we get feedback sooner
  • If we are spending time working on the wrong feature or going in the wrong direction we can quickly course correct
  • Reverting work to a previous state is a positive, not negative, as you have learned from the feedback

4. How fast should you take action and do something? What if your actions are not reversible easily?

  • Don’t wait!! When you have something of value then implement it straight away while the idea is fresh and you’re motivated.
  • Only make fast decisions if they are reasonable reversible, otherwise have a thorough discussion

5. What do we mean by “cleanup over sign-off”?

  • waiting for approval slows things down
  • prevent problems with testing and ability to roll-back
  • rather than waiting for approval, just make sure we can clean-up the problem if something goes wrong

6. What is MVC?

  • Minimal Viable Change
  • The smallest possible change to delivers the value to the user
  • If the change adds more value than what is there now, then do it
  • Still must validate that we’re adding useful functionality without major bugs or usability issues.

7. When is working iteratively hurtful?

When it is not thought out and not reversible

  • adjusting marketing messaging, consistency is key
  • adjusting product categories, have set dev plans
  • adjusting organisational structure or product scope, where real human stresses and teams involved
  • adjusting sales methodologies, have trained teams
  • adjusting values page

8. What is the goal of an iteration?

  • to get feedback from the end-user

9. What is not an iteration? give some examples that you think of yourself!

  • removing working functionality
  • reducing the product
  • irrelevant product features not in line with mission statement
  • release low effort, poor quality code so someone else can fix it
  • releasing something that gathers no useful feedback

10. If I do something without shipping to users - is it an iteration?

  • No

11. If I do something without planning at all or thinking at all - is it a valid iteration?

  • No, just an excuse to avoid planning

1. Why is working iteratively important?

to get feedback from users as soon as possible

2. Is it wise to make a complete plan for a project?

we waste time for planning a big project, based on agile methodologies everything is iteration. make some big picture, create a backlog, and choose items from the backlog for the sprint. iterate it to get things done.

3. What does working iterative protect us against?

protect the company from big costs by avoiding doing things that are not important at first. we can create a mature product by doing iterations.

4. How fast should you take action and do something? What if your actions are not reversible easily?

if the action can reverse quickly it is ok, if not it requires more approvals and discussions.

5. What do we mean by “cleanup over sign-off”?

" Cleanup over sign-off means that since we have a bias for action, and since waiting for someone’s approval can waste time, taking action swiftly while making sure that we can “clean up the mess,” if necessary, trumps the need to wait for approval."

6. What is MVC?

minimal viable change
The smallest possible change to delivers the value to the user

7. When is working iteratively hurtful?

" * adjusting marketing messaging, consistency is key

  • adjusting product categories, have set dev plans
  • adjusting organisational structure or product scope, where real human stresses and teams involved
  • adjusting sales methodologies, have trained teams
  • adjusting values page"

8. What is the goal of an iteration?

get feedback from customer(user)

9. What is not an iteration? give some examples that you think of yourself!

based on the agile methodology the output of an iteration must be fully functional software.
a simple change in ui or ux is not iteration.
fixing a bug is not an iteration.
completing unit tests is not an iteration.

10. If I do something without shipping to users - is it an iteration?

it is not just a reversion

11. If I do something without planning at all or thinking at all - is it a valid iteration?

an iteration must resolve some items from the backlog of the project without planning there can be a backlog even!

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  1. Working iteratively is valuable for a number of reasons. Firstly, it can help prevent big mistakes in the future at the cost of making little mistakes more frequently. Iteration also provides many different “states” to revert to in the event of failure. Innovation requires progress, progress can not be achieved if too much time is spent perfectly polishing every little thing before a release, proper iteration forces the wheel of progress to keep on turning.

  2. No, make your initial plan and then get to work, trusting that you will be able to act accordingly once you have arrived at the next step.

  3. Working iteratively provides us with the opportunity to prevent making large mistakes by potentially catching them as smaller ones first.

  4. As fast as reasonably possible, but always consider the outcome prior to decision making. If you find that your decision will not be easily reversible, involve the necessary parties and consult.

  5. It means that the company would rather clean up the easily manageable mess than halt progress for the sake of approval.

  6. Minimum viable change, if it adds value and you can change it, then do it.

  7. When the process of iteration itself is ineffective, it can cause more harm than good. If there is no deliberation in your iteration then is it really necessary? Iterate with common sense and a purpose of providing value.

  8. The goal of an iteration is to add something new to an existing product or service with the intent of driving forward progress. adding value and providing ourselves with the opportunity to obtain customer feedback for the purpose of further iterations.

  9. Shipping a change quickly without checking your work for errors, adding a mistake you made to documentation but not explaining how you solved the problem or making a revision instead of shipping the change to users.

  10. No, this is called a revision.

  11. No, iterations still require planning and detailed thought processes.

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  1. Iterations allow for the quickest path to customer feedback. Without that, we could be running thousands of miles in the wrong direction without even knowing it.
  2. Over-preparing leads to analysis paralysis. It’s difficult but focus on the first step only to quickly get the feedback you need to continue in the right direction. Plus “less is more”.
  3. Large and complex reversions. The smaller and consistent iterations we can take along the way will prevent larger problems in the future.
  4. Don’t wait - if you have a change that can lead to a positive impact, go for it. But you have to be mindful of the bigger picture. If the plan didn’t go as planned, is it difficult to reverse? If so, the need for further discussion is a good idea.
  5. Use methods like testing and rollbacks to keep us moving forward without approval bottlenecks.
  6. Minimal Viable Change - the mindset to ship the smallest change possible once you’ve validated its positive impact.
  7. When it’s not thought out and negatively impacts the bigger goal. For example - brand messaging, the company’s mission, or partnerships. Things that benefit from consistency.
  8. To get real-world feedback ASAP.
  9. Actions that don’t foster change or real-world feedback. For example - brainstorming sessions, repackaging ideas or waiting for approval.
  10. No, without it in the real world, you can’t learn from it.
  11. No and that can be dangerous especially if it’s hard or impossible to revert.
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Why is working iteratively important?
Small quick iterations are the key to success as they allow us to show customers what we are doing and collect feedback quickly and potentially adjust our course.
Is it wise to make a complete plan for a project?
No, don’t write a large plan; only write the first step.
What does working iterative protect us against?
Iteration Saves Us From Costly Big Mistakes. Instead of spending time working on the wrong feature or going in the wrong direction, we can ship the smallest product, receive fast feedback, and course correct.
How fast should you take action and do something? What if your actions are not reversible easily?
Don’t wait. When you have something of value like a potential merge request, piece of documentation, blog post, or a small fix, implement it straight away. We make fast decisions only when they’re easily reversible. If they’re not, we need to take a more thoughtful decision.
What do we mean by “cleanup over sign-off”?
Instead of waiting for approval we ensure we can cleanup the mess in case something goes wrong. We always try to ensure people don’t need to wait for signoff.
What is MVC?
Minimal Viable Change. Always look to make the quickest change possible to improve the user’s outcome. If you validate that the change adds more value than what is there now, then do it. No need to wait for something more robust. Specifically for product MVCs, there is additional responsibility to validate with customers that we’re adding useful functionality without obvious bugs or usability issues.
When is working iteratively hurtful?
Rapid iteration can get in the way of results if it’s not thought out.
when adjusting our marketing messaging (where consistency is key)
when adjusting product categories (where we’ve set development plans)
when adjusting organizational structure or product scope alignment(where real human stresses and team stability are involved)
when adjusting sales methodologies (where we’ve trained our teams)
when adjusting this values page (where we use the values to guide all Moralis team members)
What is the goal of an iteration?
get feedback from customer.
What is not an iteration? give some examples that you think of yourself!
Changing something without shipping it is a revision, not an iteration. Shipping something of no value. An excuse to focus on unimportant things. An excuse to avoid planning.
If I do something without shipping to users - is it an iteration?
No, this is called a revision.
If I do something without planning at all or thinking at all - is it a valid iteration?
No, it’s just to avoid planning.

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Iteration Values at Moralis Web3

  • Working iteratively in a deliberate manner is important to get feedback from the end-user.

  • It is not wise to write a large plan; only write the first step.

  • Working iteratively protects us against big costly mistakes.

  • Validate the change before taking action, and make sure it adds more value.

  • Cleanup over sign-off. Approval is optional, prevent issues instead to avoid cases where things could go wrong, otherwise, there’s a mess to be taken care of.

  • Minimal Viable Change (MVC) Always look to make the quickest change possible to improve the user’s outcome. Adding useful functionality with customer validation requires paying attention to bugs or usability issues.
  • Working iteratively hurts when making adjustments to marketing messaging, product categories, organizational structure or product scope alignment, and sales methodologies where consistency is key, where we’ve set development plans and, etc.
  • Not paying attention to quality and not passionate about the success of the iteration for the end users.
  • The goal of an iteration is to get feedback from the end-user.
  • Iteration happens when we get measurable feedback. There’s no iteration until shipping is made.
  • Not planning is an example of what’s not an iteration. :star2:
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  1. Why is working iteratively important?
    Allows us to see what customers think, collect feedback quickly and adjust course if necessary.

  2. Is it wise to make a complete plan for a project?
    Better to write the first iteration, build it quickly, release and assess from there.

  3. What does working iterative protect us against?
    Saves us from big, costly mistakes based on false assumptions.

  4. How fast should you take action and do something? What if your actions are not reversible easily?
    Immediately, and only if they are reversible. Non-reversible decisions should be made more thoughtfully/deliberately.

  5. What do we mean by “cleanup over sign-off”?
    Instead of waiting for approval/sign-off, ensure any mess can be cleaned up easily if something goes wrong.

  6. What is MVC?
    Minimum-viable-change, the quickest change to improve the user’s outcome.

  7. When is working iteratively hurtful?
    Rapid iteration can get in the way of results in certain cases. e.g. Adjusting marketing messaging, where consistency is key

  8. What is the goal of an iteration?
    To get feedback from the end-user.

  9. What is not an iteration? give some examples that you think of yourself!
    Changing something without shipping it is a revision, not an iteration. Or changing something and compromising on security. Avoiding documentation in the name of haste. Changing something that you know someone else will have to clean up or fix.

  10. If I do something without shipping to users - is it an iteration?
    No, it’s a revision.

  11. If I do something without planning at all or thinking at all - is it a valid iteration?
    No. Iterations must be made deliberately.

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  1. Small iterations can save us a lot of time from making big mistakes. It’s also how we can move forward faster, instead of doing a big release once a quarter or so.
  2. It’s more important to plan it’s goal and to make the first step towards that. Iterations that will follow can have a ticket created and linked to the first step, so we don’t lose sight of it.
  3. Making big mistakes, wasting time, money, resources etc. Creating a feature/product that the customers will not use/be happy wit.
  4. It’s important to take fast decisions, if they can also be fixed easily. If something requires more time/rollback procedures, it’s better to think on it a bit more thoroughly.
  5. Action vs approvals. Better to go forward with an action and then clean up the remaining parts if something is wrong, then waiting for approvals and such.
  6. Minimal viable change. This is reflected in how we do iterations and how we work.
  7. When making changes to the marketing messages, to the product categories, sales methodologies. This also happens when the team’s stability is involved, how we train the teams etc.
  8. The goal is to get feedback from the end-user or customer.
  9. Waiting a long time to make a release, not getting feedback from the users, reducing quality etc.
  10. No, it’s just a revision.
  11. It needs to provide value to the users and also keeping your team updated to this change.
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  1. Working iteratively is important because that’s a way to get fast and meaningful feedback from the customer, such that you can improve the product and grow even further. Working iteratively also allows the customers to see what the company is doing, and to adjust the course quickly.

  2. It is not necessarily wise to make a complete plan for a project. Only write the first step and move on from there. This way you can also get the motivation to work quicker on the project.

  3. Working iteratively protects a company against making mistakes which might cost a lot of time and money to fix. If you do not work iteratively and don’t get feedback quickly from customers, then you can work on the wrong feature or you might be going in the wrong direction which is very costly to correct, compared to a small set of features.

  4. In case something is of value, then don’t wait and take action straight away. Things should be easily reversible because the iteration is small. But in case they aren’t easily reversible, then make a more thoughtful decision by involving more people if needed.

  5. Cleanup over sign-off means that the focus should not be put on waiting for an approval, but instead ensure that the mistake can be cleaned up fast and easy, such that you do not have to wait for somebody else to sign off, because it is slow.

  6. MVC means making the minimal viable change. That means making the smallest/quickest change in order to improve the user’s outcome and experience. So this in turn means not waiting for a more robust solution, but deliver quickly such that the customer can get the benefit.

  7. Working iteratively can be hurtful in situations when a certain level of consistency is required or when the decision affects humans in a harmful way. For example, when adjusting the organizational structure, or when adjusting the values of the company, or when adjusting the marketing messaging.

  8. The goal of an iteration is to receive fast feedback from the end-user. The goal should be to achieve as much as possible in the shortest amount of time.

  9. An iteration not an iteration when you actually don’t release your change to the end-user, because that’s the way you receive valuable feedback. Also, an iteration is not when you bundle multiple changes into one package and deliver those. Better to deliver only one change, get feedback, and then release the next.

  10. No, doing something without shipping to users is not an iteration, because an iteration is when you deliver to users and get valuable feedback back, and improve your product afterwards.

  11. No, it is not a valid iteration, because even for a small change which is to be released to a customer, it requires thought and planning, such that silly mistakes are avoided.

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  1. Because we get feedback from the enduser and can improve our work.
  2. No, just write the first few steps and get going.
  3. From going down the wrong path.
  4. Fast. We decide a short timeframe and try to create something within that.
  5. Instead of waiting for approval we ensure we can cleanup the mess in case something goes wrong.
  6. A minimal viable change. If you validate that the change adds more value than what is there now, then do it.
  7. Where consistency is key. Where we set development plans. Where team stability is involved.
  8. When you ship something small to user that tests it and share feedback with you.
  9. When you’re not shipping what you’ve changed. I.e. a ux change that you’ve made but didn’t ship it.
  10. No.
  11. No.
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  1. Working Iteratively is important because it gets us feedback from the end-user. Small quick iteration allows us to show customers what we are doing and collect feedback quickly and potentially adjust our course.
  2. No, it is wise to make a plan for the first step instead of a complete plan at a time.
  3. Working iterative protect us from costly big mistakes
  4. Right away. if there is something to do or change or update then do it right way while everything is still fresh in our heads. If our actions are not going to reversible easily then there is a need to have a thorough discussion beforehand.
  5. It is to ensure people don’t need to wait for sign-off. Having automation and cleaning up the mess instead of waiting for approval helps.
  6. MVC is Minimal Viable Change which means making quickest and smallest change possible to improve user’s outcome.
  7. Working iteratively is hurtful when where consistency is key, we’ve set development plans, stress and team stability is involved, and when business process or specific descriptions are being changed.
  8. The goal of an iteration is to get feedback from the end-user. we do small things quickly so we could show customers what we are doing and get feedback right away.
  9. Doing something without having it shared/deployed to be experienced by users. For example, constantly working on pages that is not going to be accessible to anyone.
  10. No, because should be able to experience it to provide feedback which is one of the essence of iteration.
  11. No, it’s a waste of time. Having a first step still involves thinking and planning.
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  1. Why is working iteratively important?
    Because it allows us to show customers what we are doing and gather feedback quickly to adjust our course

  2. Is it wise to make a complete plan for a project?
    No, it is much wiser to work based on the feedback we quickly gather through iterations

  3. What does working iterative protect us against?
    It protects us against having to revert bigger features that we were working on without knowing they were wrong

  4. How fast should you take action and do something? What if your actions are not reversible easily?
    If it is something of value that can be implemented right away, it should be done as fast as possible as we have everything in our head. If something is difficult to reverse, then a more thorough discussion is needed

  5. What do we mean by “cleanup over sign-off”?
    We mean that is preferable to have a way of cleaning something that went wrong instead of always waiting to have approvals for the things that need to be done

  6. What is MVC?
    A minimally viable change, it is the quickest change possible to improve user’s outcome

  7. When is working iteratively hurtful?
    When the product is already settled and customers expect some stability. In such cases we should provide users something that will give them a better understanding of the benefits in the long term

  8. What is the goal of an iteration?
    It is to get feedback from the end-user

  9. What is not an iteration? give some examples that you think of yourself!
    It is changing something without shipping it, shipping something that has no value or that compromises security

  10. If I do something without shipping to users - is it an iteration?
    No, it is a revision

  11. If I do something without planning at all or thinking at all - is it a valid iteration?
    No, an iteration has to be planned

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